Stations

Butler Station

The existing Butler Station will experience minimal impacts as part of the Yanchep Rail Extension.

The Butler Station will change from an end-of-the-line station, and become a through station enabling trains to travel north or south on the Joondalup Line.

Work at Butler Station will include extending the existing platform, and connecting the new and existing train tracks. Any short-term disruptions to the station’s operations will be comprehensively communicated in advance.

Alkimos Station

Approximately a 41-minute journey from Perth, Alkimos Station will serve the future city-scale Alkimos Central development, which has been master planned by DevelopmentWA to provide much needed key service amenities to the area. 

Located on the corner of Romeo Road and Marmion Avenue, west of Wanneroo Road, the station will have a ground-level concourse and station building, with two platforms located in a cutting and connections to both sides of the development.

The Noongar place name for Alkimos Station is Kyleeup and the narrative is ‘Place of the Kylee (Boomerang)’.

The new station will feature:

  • public toilets, services such as vending machines, kiosk, passenger ticketing/information, staff amenities, station administration offices, storage/cleaning and operational facilities
  • a shared path, two secure bike shelters with the ability to add additional shelters in the future
  • eight-stand bus interchange with four layover bays, seating and information facilities
  • dedicated passenger drop-off area and approximately 600 parking bays.

Future planning for the precinct around Alkimos Station will be managed by DevelopmentWA.

Read more about the station on the Alkimos Station fact sheet

Station architecture

Local landmarks and early investigations conducted with the METRONET Noongar Reference Group identified important local Noongar themes, such as the limestone pinnacles and Melaleuca huegelii, which influenced the station's architecture.

Melaleucas are often referred to as ‘Teatree’ or ‘Paperbark’ trees. Melaleuca huegelii was extremely important to Noongar people due to its versatility – large pieces could provide coverage for shelters, smaller pieces were used to carry water and wrap food, and the leaves could be crushed for the medicinal properties of the aromatic oil, which could be brewed as a healing tea. It is also a well-known native species familiar to most Western Australians, and often planted in local parks or on verges.

Eglinton Station

Approximately a 46-minute journey from Perth, Eglinton Station will be built south of Pipidinny Road, east of Marmion Avenue and west of Wanneroo Road.

 

Accessed via a station building at ground-level, the two platforms will be located in a cutting with at least 50 per cent coverage.

The Noongar place name for Eglinton Station is Wilgarup and the narrative is ‘Place of the ochre’.

The station will feature:

  • public services such as vending machines, passenger ticketing/information, storage/cleaning and operational facilities
  • a shared path, two secure bike shelters with the ability to add additional shelters in the future
  • eight-stand bus interchange with four layover bays and information facilities
  • dedicated passenger drop-off area and approximately 400 parking bays, with the potential to expand to approximately 1,000 bays.

Read more about the station on the Eglinton Station fact sheet.  

Station architecture 

Early investigations conducted with the METRONET Noongar Reference Group identified important local flora species, such as Eucalyptus Globulus woodlands and Grevillea Preissii, which has influenced the station's architecture.

Noongar people often called flowering shrubs, such as grevilleas, Berrung. Grevillea nectar was an important source of sweetness in Noongar food. Nectar could be sucked directly from the flowers themselves, or sweet drinks could be made by soaking the flowers in water. Grevillea Preissii is widely used in landscaping today for its low water requirements and bird-attracting qualities.

Yanchep Station

Approximately a 49-minute journey from Perth, Yanchep Station will become the heart of Perth’s newest strategic business centre.

 

The end-of-the-line station will be located south of the future Toreopango Avenue, north of Yanchep Beach Road, east of Marmion Avenue and west of Wanneroo Road.

The Noongar place name for Yanchep Station is Yanchep and the narrative is ‘A native flax or bulrush’ (Yanchep is derived from the Noongar word Yanget).

Built in a cutting, with a cut and cover approach to provide ground-level connections in a concourse area to each side of the railway, Yanchep Station’s future-proof design provides land development opportunities, while meeting passenger needs from day one of operations.

The station will feature:

  • public toilets, public services such as vending machines, kiosk, passenger ticketing/information, staff amenities, station administration offices, storage/cleaning and operational facilities
  • a shared path, two secure bike shelters with the ability to add more shelters in the future
  • 14-stand bus interchange including seven layover bays, seating and information facilities
  • dedicated passenger drop-off area and approximately 1,000 parking bays.

Read more about the station on the Yanchep Station fact sheet

Take a 360 degree look of the Yanchep Station Entrance and the Yanchep Station Platform.

Station architecture 

Early investigations were conducted with the METRONET Noongar Reference Group to identify important local landmarks, such as the Banksia Menziesii and neighbouring Yanchep Caves, which has influenced the station's architecture.

The Banksia Menziesii, with its orange cone shaped flowers, has been chosen to represent Yanchep Station as Banksia is typical of the area and portrays warmth (fire) and nurturing (nectar).

The Yanchep caves are a registered Aboriginal site with their own stories and mythology about their creation and importance to Noongar people.

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